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100 Eleventh Avenue

Northeast corner at 19th Street

Rendering of 100 Eleventh Avenue

Rendering of 100 Eleventh Avenue with Frank O. Gehry's IAC building at right

 
By Carter B. Horsley

One of the most highly anticipated new buildings in New York City in 2007 was 100 Eleventh Avenue, a 21-story residential condominium tower designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel and Beyer Blinder Belle across 19th Street from the new IAC/Interactive Corporation Building designed by Frank O. Gehry.

Mr. Nouvel has described the tower as a "vision machine."

100 Eleventh Avenue

Full view from 19th Street

The project claims to "feature the most highly-engineered and technologically advanced curtain wall ever constructed in New York City - a gently curving, glittering mosaic of nearly 1,700 different-sized panes of colorless glass, each set at a unique angle and torque, sheathing one of the most meticulously customized, high performance residential addresses in the nation."

"The main south curtain wall is comprised of approximately 1,647 completely different colorless windowpanes organized within enormous steel-framed 'megapanels' that range from 11 to 16 feet tall and as wide as 37 feet across. Each window pane inside these megapanels is titled at a different angle and in a different direction - up, down, in, out - bearing a slightly different degree of transparency," according to a press release for the project that maintained that the design "is inspired in part by the renowned stained-glass window cycles of the 13th Century Gothic cathedral of Saint-Chapelle in Paris."

View looking up in atrium Closer view looking up in atrium

Views looking up in atrium

The press release for the project also stated that "The building's dazzling Mondrian-like window pattern will frame splendid views from within the tower while producing an exterior texture that serves as a poetic analog for the vibrancy, density and changeability of New York."

The building will also have a seven-story street wall "of mullioned glass 15 feet from the building's fašade to reflect fleeting images of life beyond the building while creating a semi-enclosed atrium unprecedented in New York City" and "within the atrium, suspended gardens of ornamental vegetation and trees will appear to float in mid-air; private indoor and outdoor terraces will extend from residences; and an open-air dining patio for the lobby restaurant."

The north and east facades of the building will be clad in black brick that are meant to harken "West Chelsea's industrial architecture" and it will have windows of different sizes. The north fašade will "express motion within: Elevator shafts will contain random LED lighting and full-scale punched windows, so that passengers in glass-walled cabs can see city vistas."

The developers are West Chelsea Development Partners LLC, a venture of Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors and Cape Advisors, of which Craig D. Wood is a principal.

View of east facade

View of east facade

Nouvel (see The City Review article on his planned 1,155-foot-high tower near the Museum of Modern Art) is the architect of 40 Mercer Street, which is nearing completion in SoHo and is notable for its large sliding windows, and of the Arab World Institute and the new Quai Branly Museum, both in Paris.

The building, which is just to the south of a juvenile detention center, has 72 apartments that will range in size from 890 to 4,675 square feet and prices will range from $1,600,000 to $22,000,000.

All apartments have south and west views and mechanized shade systems.

The north and south facades, in contrast, are be clad in black brick with different size punched windows and the north fašade has elevator shafts with random LED lighting and full-scale punched windows so that passengers in glass-walled cabs and see city vistas.

The building, which will be LEED certified, was scheduled for occupancy in 2009. The building has have a 24-hour doorman, a daytime concierge and 24-hour off-site concierge service, a lobby restaurant, a garden, an ATM, a private screening room, storage rooms, a 70-foot-long swimming pool and a gym. Ceiling heights range from 10 feet 1 inch to 11 feet 1.5 inches and the penthouse ceilings range from 12 to 16 feet.

View from the south

View from the south

New renderings and details of the planned 21-story residential condominium tower designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel and Beyer Blinder Belle at 100 Eleventh Avenue across 19th Street from the new w IAC/Interactive Corporation Building designed by Frank O. Gehry are now available.

Bathrooms will have touch-sensitive fixtures by Jado that include computerized water flow and temperature sensors. The bathrooms will have Kohler tubs and water closets, and fritted glass and Corian surfaces.

Apartments will have operable windows oriented to the south and west and along those window walls floors will be finished with an extra layer of "nearly imperceptible transparent gloss, to boost incoming sunlight into rooms." One rendering on the building's website indicated that some rooms facing the Hudson River will have multiple hanging scrims in front of the windows.

The website also claims that "the building's mirror-canopied pool is designed so that residents may swim comfortably indoors or outdoors, depending upon the weather," adding that "a state-of-the-art glass partition has been customized to enclose the indoor portion of the pool during winter months or inclement weather, so that the indoor portion remains fully operative and warm at all times."

"By raising the restaurant and other public functions of the ground floor to 4' above grade and sculpting a concrete base, Nouvel has created a perfect balance between pedestrian activity and the lively atmosphere of interiors," the website proclaimed.

The project claims to "feature the most highly-engineered and technologically advanced curtain wall ever constructed in New York City - a gently curving, glittering mosaic of nearly 1,700 different-sized panes of colorless glass, each set at a unique angle and torque, sheathing one of the most meticulously customized, high performance residential addresses in the nation."

The developers are West Chelsea Development Partners LLC, a venture of Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors and Cape Advisors, of which Craig D. Wood is a principal.
Nouvel is the architect of 40 Mercer Street, which is nearing completion in SoHo and is notable for its large sliding windows, and of the Arab World Institute and the new Quai Branly Museum, both in Paris.

The building, which will be LEED certified, is scheduled for occupancy late fall 2008.

 Rendering of base of buiding

Rendering of base of building

This very dramatic, 21-story residential condominium tower designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel and Beyer Blinder Belle at 100 Eleventh Avenue across 19th Street from the new IAC/Interactive Corporation Building designed by Frank O. Gehry was scheduled for completion in 2010 and was described by Mr. Nouvel as a "vision machine."

It was an "instant landmark" as soon as renderings were released in the spring of 2007.

The project claims to "feature the most highly-engineered and technologically advanced curtain wall ever constructed in New York City - a gently curving, glittering mosaic of nearly 1,700 different-sized panes of colorless glass, each set at a unique angle and torque, sheathing one of the most meticulously customized, high performance residential addresses in the nation."

"The main south curtain wall is comprised of approximately 1,647 completely different colorless windowpanes organized within enormous steel-framed 'megapanels' that range from 11 to 16 feet tall and as wide as 37 feet across. Each windowpane inside these megapanels is titled at a different angle and in a different direction - up, down, in, out - bearing a slightly different degree of transparency," according to a press release for the project that maintained that the design "is inspired in part by the renowned stained-glass window cycles of the 13th Century Gothic cathedral of Saint-Chapelle in Paris."

The press release also stated that "The building's dazzling Mondrian-like window pattern will frame splendid views from within the tower while producing an exterior texture that serves as a poetic analog for the vibrancy, density and changeability of New York."

The building has a seven-story street wall "of mullioned glass 15 feet from the building's fašade to reflect fleeting images of life beyond the building while creating a semi-enclosed atrium unprecedented in New York City" and "within the atrium, suspended gardens of ornamental vegetation and trees will appear to float in mid-air; private indoor and outdoor terraces will extend from residences; and an open-air dining patio for the lobby restaurant."

The north and east facades of the building are clad in black brick that are meant to harken "West Chelsea's industrial architecture" and have windows of different sizes. The north fašade expresses "motion within: Elevator shafts will contain random LED lighting and full-scale punched windows, so that passengers in glass-walled cabs can see city vistas."

The developers are West Chelsea Development Partners LLC, a venture of Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors and Cape Advisors, of which Craig D. Wood is a principal.

Nouvel is the architect of 40 Mercer Street in Soho and is notable for its large sliding windows, and of the Arab World Institute and the new Quai Branly Museum, both in Paris. He is also the architect of a very tall, asymmetrical, mixed-use tower that received various special permits and public approvals in 2009 for a site just to the west of the Museum of Modern Art on East 53rd Street but no timetable for its construction has been announced.

The Eleventh Avenue building, which is just to the south of a juvenile detention center, has 72 apartments that range in size from 890 to 4,675 square feet and prices initially ranged from $1,600,000 to $22,000,000.

All apartments have south and west views and mechanized shade systems.

The building will has a 24-hour doorman, a daytime concierge and 24-hour off-site concierge service, a lobby restaurant, a garden, an ATM, a private screening room, storage rooms, a 70-foot-long swimming pool and a gym. Ceiling heights range from 10 feet 1 inch to 11 feet 1.5 inches and the penthouse ceilings range from 12 to 16 feet.

Detail of facade

Detail of finished facade

In his March 15, 2010, review of the building in The New York Times, architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff noted that "its mix of grit and glamour - embodied in a glittering facade that seems to have been wrapped around the curved front of a black brick tower like a tight-fitting sequined dress - is apt to temper whatever you may feel about the Wall Streeters and art-world insiders who are likely to move into its apartments."

View from one block south

View from one block south

"It conjures a downtown New York we once loved and can now barely remember, where rundown manufacturing buildings buzzed with cultural vitality. The building's rough-edged sex appeal may actually overshadow what's best about the projet, the remarkable skill with which Mr. Nouvel embeds it into its surroundings....Its shifting appearance is a sly commentary on the conflict between public and private realms that is an inevitable byproduct of gentrification....Seen from across the West Side Highway, the tower's twinkling facade, with its hundreds of irregularly shaped windows tilted at odd angles to reflect fragments of sky or the surrounding city, offers a striking counterpoint to the soft, sail-like curves of Mr. Gehry's creation....Some will argue that all of this simply provides a veneer of civility to a culture that is sliding deeper and deeper into narcissism. For me, though, the building is a lesson on how to navigate an enlightened path in an era of extremes. It's not utopia, but it demonstrates what a major talent can accomplish when he focuses his mind on a small corner of the city."

Narcissists like to look at themselves but here Mr. Nouvel has shattered their reflections!

In the spring of 2011 the completed building is very impressive although the thin, dull, gray spandrels and mullions are disappointing for those who assumed from the first public renderings that they would be stainless steel.  In most lights, the battleship gray "joints" are overwhelming by the "shattered" facade and certainly stainless steel would have been more expensive....(4/16/11)

For more information on 100 Eleventh Avenue check its entry at CityRealty.com

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