Art/Auction logos

Contemporary Art

Christie's

7PM, May 11, 2005

Sale 1516

"Sail Cloth" by de Kooning

Lot 19, "Sail Cloth," by Willem de Kooning, oil, enamel, charcoal and graphite on board, 22 1/2 by 29 inches, 1949

By Carter B. Horsley

This evening Contemporary Art auction at Christie's May 11, 2005 is highlighted by several outstanding Abstract Expressionist works including a great early abstraction by Willem de Kooning, a marvelous, large work by Franz Kline, an excellent painting by Philip Guston, a fine drawing by Arshile Gorky and a superb Clyfford Still as well as good works by Mark Rothko and Barnet Newman.

In addition, it has two very good works by Richard Diebenkorn, two very good boxes by Joseph Cornell, a good sculpture by Isamu Noguchi, a large and good work by Anselm Kiefer and an important oil by Edward Hopper, whose works are normally sold in the American Paintings auctions.

The handsomest work in the auction is Lot 19, a vivid and very strong early abstraction by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997), entitled "Sailcloth." It was one of several important works consigned to the auction by Barbara and Donald Jonas to benefit the Jewish Communal Fund. It had an estimate of $8,000,000 to $12,000,000. It sold for $13,120,000 including the buyer's premium as do all results mentioned in this article. The auction features 13, mostly museum-quality works in the Jonas group and all the works sold for a total of $44,200,000, nicely above the pre-sale high estimate for this group of $40,800,000.

The sale was a great success as 86 percent of the 76 offered lots sold for a total of $133,707,200. After the sale, Christopher Burge, the auctioneer, noted that 96 percent of the sold lots went above or within their pre-sale estimates and that 35 lots sold for more than $1 million. It was the second major auction in a row in which Christie's showing was decidedly better than Sotheby's. Mr. Burge described the very lively auction as "thrilling" and said that 79 percent of the buyers were American.

Records were set for 15 artists.

The de Kooning did not set a sales record - his high auction mark is $20,680,000, but it may well have set a new "time" record as the bidding advanced very slowly, mostly at $100,000 increments.

The catalogue provides the following excellent commentary:

"Sail Cloth is one of the samll group of outstanding 'abstract' paintings made in the late 1940's with which Willem de Kooning made his name as the leading painter of his generation. Representing the culmination of over twenty years' experimentation with a variety of styles and influence, these paintings mark the artist's dramatic leap forward into the then uncharted realm of 'pure' painting. Invoking and celebrating the spontaneity and excitement of the act and process of painting, it was these paintings that prompted the critic Harold Rosenberg to coin the term 'Action Painting' as a potential description of the new movement then emerging in New York. Forming the essence of what soon came to be termed 'Abstract Expressionism,' this small group of paintings are regarded by many to be not only the finest of all de Kooning's works but also among the greatest painterly achievements of the Twentieth century....Dense, compressed and alive with fluid lines and dark powerful, suggestive forms, they seemed to hover in a painterly netherworld halfway between conventional abstraction and figuration, expressing what de Kooning once described as a 'glimpse' of something that he had as much felt as wittnessed or seen. Packed amidst the thousand 'decisions and revisions of decisions' that evidently had gone into the building of his pictures, de Kooning's art seemed to express something of the energy, emotion, chaos, violence, immediacy, congestion and excitement that a modern urban environment such as Manhattan instills in the lone human being. Pregnant with implied meaning yet seemingly devoid of content, the extraordinary paintings that de Kooning produced at this time, appeared, at a stroke, to have answered many of the most pressing questions and anxieties over the future of painting then facing the American avant-garde....refuting the use of abstraction towards the the essentially myustical end of transcendence (as adopted by Rothko or Newman for example), de Kooning drew on the spontaneity of automatism and on chance configuations as a way of generating paintings that conveyed, through the viscosity of their own medium, the vitality and immediacy of tangible coproareal life. De Kooning achieved this remarkable feat primarily through a conscious and premediated disruption of is own lyrical and masterly ability with line.....Struggle and the evidence of struggle formed the essence of de Kooning's art at this time. To keep his eye sharp and his hand fresh..., he developed a technique of painting from multiple drawings layered over one another. The layering of these often torn or fragmentary drawings created collage-like configurations in which the original meaning and integrity of the single image was lost amidst a strange conglomerate whole that teemed with a fascinating and spontaneously created vitality....it..., in its freer painterliness and strange insertion of a human eye at the centre of the composition, anticiptes the artists later Women series. Such facial features as the eyes, particularly, the mouths of the figures...served de Kooning as an important figurative crutch and key compositional element around which he felt he could work with more fluency and ease."

"Crow Dancer" by Kline

Lot 16, "Crow Dancer," by Franz Kline, oil on canvas, 78 by 69 inches, 1958

Lot 16, "Crow Dancer," is a monumental and wonderful work by Franz Kline (1910-1962) that is also part of the Jonas group. An oil on canvas that measures 78 by 69 inches, it was executed in 1958. It has a conservative estimate of $4,000,000 to $6,000,000. It sold for $6,400,000, breaking the artist's previous auction record of $4,519,500 set at Sotheby's November 12, 2002. It was one of 17 records set at this auction.

"The forms in Kline's paintings often have a figurative appearance," the catalogue entry noted, "which is particularly strong in the black areas of Crow Dancer. Here, we can really envisage the frenetic energy of a tribal dance bedecked in feathers, as is hinted at by the title. ....The visible and pulsating energy of the brushstrokes is that of an abandoned and myustical dance. Kline was greatly interested in and intrigued by the place names of his childhhood surroundings, not least those with Native American origins....Kline was conscious to a far greater extent than the other first-rankabstract Expressionists of the distinctly American identity of their so-called movement, and distills it into this work, creating a new, yet established painterly mythology, invoking the Wagnerian gods of a new continent and a younger, more vital civilization through a younger, more vital art form."

Another Kline, Lot 11, "Red Field (formerly Black Over Reds)," also from the Jonas group, set a record for a work by the artist on paper. It sold for $576,000, breaking the previous record of $310,500 set at Sotheby's November 17, 1999. The oil on paper measures 12 7/8 by 9 1/8 inches and was painted in 1955. A very strong and beautiful work, it has an estimate of $100,000 to $150,000 and was once in the collection of Mrs. Nathan Cummings.

'Untitled (Medici Princess)" by Cornell "Untitled (Pinturicchio Boy)" by Cornell

Lot 17, "Untitled (Medici Princess), wood box construction, printed paper collage, enamel, wood and colored and mirrored glass, 15 1/4 by 12 by 3 7/8 inches, circa 1952, left, and Lot 18, "Untitled (Pinturicchio Boy)," wood box construction, printed paper collage, enamel, metal and colored and mirrored glass, 15 by 11 1/4 by 4 3/8 inches, circa 1946, right, both by Joseph Cornell

One of the highlights of the Jonas group is a pair of wood box construction, printed paper collage, enamel, and colored and mirrored glass works by Joseph Cornell. Lot 17, "Untitled (Medici Princess), measures 15 1/4 by 12 by 3 7/8 inches and was executed circa 1952. The other, Lot 18, "Untitled (Pinturicchio Boy)," measures 15 by 11 1/4 by 4 3/8 inches and was executed circa 1946. Both lots have estimates of $700,000 to $1,000,000. The former sold for $2,592,000, which broke the artist's previous auction record of $495,000 set at Christie's November 13, 1989. Lot 18, sold for $1,584,000.

"Composition II" by Gorky

Lot 13, "Composition II," by Arshile Gorky, graphite and wax crayon on paper, 23 by 29 inches, 1943

Lot 13 is a very good graphite and wax crayon on paper by Arshile Gorky (1904-1948), also part of the Jonas group. Entitled "Composition II," it measures 23 by 29 inches and was executed in 1943. It has an estimate of $900,000 to $1,200,000. It sold for $2,760,000, breaking the artist's former auction record of $697,000 set at Sotheby's November 12, 2002.

"Untitled" by Rothko

Lot 22, "Untitled," by Mark Rothko, oil on canvas, 81 by 69 inches, 1964

Lot 22, another Jonas property, is a large, dark, classic abstraction by Mark Rothko (1903-1970)(see The City Review article on a Rothko exhibition.) Untitled, it is an oil on canvas that measures 81 by 69 inches and was executed in 1964. It has an estimate of $8,000,000 to $10,000,000. It sold for $10,096,000.

"Untitled 2" by Newman

Lot 20, "Untitled 2," by Barnet Newman, oil on paper mounted on canvas, 24 3/8 by 36 3/8 inches, 1948

A more handsome abstraction in the Jonas group is Lot 20, "Untitled 2," by Barnet Newman (1905-1970), a nice and lovely companion to the Rothko. An oil on paper, one of only two such works by Newman that are known to exist, mounted on canvas, it measures 24 3/8 by 36 3/8 inches and was executed in 1948 several months after Newman's first "zip" painting, "Onement 1." It has an estimate of $1,500,000 to $2,000,000. It sold for $1,920,000.

"Bindu" by Noguchi

Lot 12, "Bindu," by Isamu Noguchi, basalt, 26 1/4 inches high, 1966-7

The Jonas group includes two sculptures by Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988), Lots 12 and 15. The former is entitled "Bindu," and is a basalt sculpture that is 26 1/4 inches high and was executed circa 1966-7. by Isamu Noguchi, basalt, 26 1/4 inches high, circa 1966-7. The latter is entitled "The Cry" and is a cast bronze work that is 81 inches high and was executed in 1959-1963 and is number two of an indition of six and one artist's proof. Lot 15 has an estimate of $500,000 to $700,000. It sold for $1,024,000 breaking the artist's previous auction record of $732,800 that was set by Lot 12. Lot 12, which had an estimate of $250,000 to $350,000, broke the previous artist's auction record of $643,750.

"Bride's Folly" by Rauschenberg

Lot 14, "Bride's Folly," by Robert Rauschenberg, combine painting, oil, fabric, paper, printed paper collage and metal on canvas, 1959

Robert Rauschenberg (b. 1925) began his "Combines" series in 1954. "The Combines," the catalogue entry noted, "incorporated all and any materials that lay to hand as a surface and.or support for his paint. Fusing the material and objects or real life with paint in this way was an act of integration between the artist's daily life and his work that Rauschenberg consciously sought as a new and vital means of expression....of paramount importance for Rauschenberg was the matter-of-factness of these objects and the arbitrariness of their combination...Rauschenberg's use of paint is almost unique. he appears to use it in an ego-less and autonomous way that demonstrates its material properties, its plasticity, opaqueness and its integrity." Lot 14 is an excellent Rauschenberg combine from the Jonas group that is entitled "Bride's Folly." It measures 57 1/2 by 38 3/4 inches and was executed in 1959. It has an estimate of $3,000,000 to $4,000,000. It sold for $3,040,000.

"The Street" by Guston

Lot 31, "The Street," by Philip Guston, oil on canvas, 76 by 71 1/2 inches, 1956

Lot 31 is a major work by Philip Guston (1913-1980), entitled "The Street." An oil on canvas that measures 76 by 71 1/2 inches, it was executed in 1956 and was consigned as "property from the collection of Ruth and Harvey Kaplan." It has an estimate of $3,000,000 to $4,000,000.

"The Street represents the zenith of Guston's achievement as a first gnetiaonl Abstract Expressionist painter in the pantheon alongside his childhood friend Jackson Pollock and his cohorts, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko. It is one of a mslall body of nearly square-shaped paintings executed between 1962 and 1956....Characterized by exquisite brushwork, centralized areas of amorphous shapes and brilliantly nuanced passages of fleshy color, it was these qualities that secured Guston's reputation as a dominant member of the New York School. The composer, John Cage, described Guston's abstract paintings as 'that beautiful land,' as much for their sublime splendor as their organic structure and living presence.....Guston saw painting as a wrestling contest with chaos. He looked to the example of Piet Mondrian to provide an inherent structure of framework for his abstractions, especially the latter's 'plus and minus paintings,' with their small counter-plays between vertical and horizontal marks. Guston similarly used clusters of short individual brushstrokes as the building blocks for pictures like The Street, mobilizing the massed forms in the centre of the canvas where color is the strongest and tensions are the most extreme. 'Look at any inspired painting,' Guston told a Time reporter in 1952, 'It's like a gong sounding; it puts you in state of reverberation.' ...It was because of the shimmering facture of his surfaces, his tactile brushstrokes and the atmospheric presence of his forms that Guston was often called an "Abstract Impressionist' and his work compared to late Monet and Pissarro. But Guston himself had little affinity for the Impressionists. ...Dory Ashton tells a story of a visit to Guston's studio by the composers Morton Feldman and john Cage. Confronted with the etherial vision of one of Guston's Abstract paintings, Cage exclaimed, 'My God, it's possible to paint a magnificent picture about nothing.' To which Feldman replied, "But, John, its about evertyhing.'"

"The Street" sold for $7,926,000, smashing the artist's previous auction record of $1,879,500 set at Sotheby's November 12, 2002.

"Untitled" by Still

Lot 28, "Untitled," by Clyfford Still, oil on canvas, 114 by 166 inches, 1959

Lot 28 is a huge and great orange, yellow and white untitled abstraction by Clyfford Still (1904-1980). Executed in 1959, it has a very modest estimate of $1,000,000 to $1,500,000. It sold for $1,920,000. The artist's auction is $3,144,000, which is relatively low considering the market's valuations of many Abstract Expressionists.

"Chair Car" by Hopper

Lot 34, "Chair Car," by Edward Hopper, oil on canvas, 40 by 50 inches, 1965

Lot 34, "Chair Car," is a good, classic work by Edward Hopper (1882-1967). An oil on canvas that measures 40 by 50 inches, it has an estimate on request that was understood to be about $12,000,000 to $15,000,000. It sold for $14,016,000, an auction record for Hopper, to Eric Wilding, the head of Christie's American Paintings Department, who was on the telephone and instantly announced on the hammer that the winning bidder was Berry-Hill Gallery, one of the leading dealers in New York in American paintings. The work's inclusion in a Contemporary Art auction rather than in the American Paintings auction was very unusual. The painting is part of the Collection of Helen and David B. Ball from which Christie's is selling 49 works throughout the Spring auction season this year. In a press release on this work, Christie's noted that "With its strong emphasis on perspective and proportion, Chair Car is one of Hopper's most magnificent examples of tension and emotion, portraying the travelers' feeling of anticipation." The catalogue entry observed that it "exemplifies the hauntingly detached urban scenes for which the artist is most renowned....As in most of his best works, Hopper presents in Chair Car a tableau of people who play out personal dramas in a stage-like or even cinematic space. These solitary and seemingly lonely people are central to the work, and a major theme in Hopper's art throughout this career. In Chair Car, the paucity of passengers and spatial emptiness may also imply an anxious emotional state, although alternative readings are certainly possible, particularly with the artist's use of sunlight as a note of warmth and a counterpoint to the implied loneliness of the travelers. In this and similar scenes, Hopper offers ambiguity and complexity - suited to modern life - while transforming the familiar with almost magical effect."

"Untitled (Santa Cruz I)" by Diebenkorn

Lot 43, "Untitled (Santa Cruz I)," by Richard Diebenkorn, oil on canvas, 36 by 52 inches, 1962

The auction includes several fine works by Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993)(see The City Review article on a Diebenkorn exhibition) highlighted by Lot 43, "Untitled (Santa Cruz I)," an 36-by-52-inch oil on canvas. Executed in 1962, it has an estimate of $1,800,000 to $2,500,000. It sold for $3,376,000 to a European dealer.

"Untitled (Ocean Park #26)" by Diebenkorn

Lot 35, "Untitled (Ocean Park #26)," by Richard Diebenkorn, gouache, acrylic and oil pastel on two joined sheets of paper, 24 by 38 inches, 1984

Lot 35 is a fine gouache, acrylic and oil pastel on two joined sheets of paper that was painted by Diebenkorn in 1984. An untitled work that is number 26 in the artist's famous "Ocean Park" series, it measures 24 by 38 inches. It has an estimate of $800,000 to $1,000,000. It sold for $1,304,000.

A smaller but very strong oil on canvas by Diebenkorn, Lot 33, "Untitled (Landscape)," has a modest estimate of $700,000 to $900,000. It measures 18 1/2 by 13 1/8 inches and was painted in 1957. It sold for $1,080,000.

"Seated Figure" by Bacon

Lot 41, "Seated Figure," by Francis Bacon, oil on canvas, 77 3/4 by 58 1/8 inches, 1979

Lot 41 is a very bright and good "Seated Figure" by Francis Bacon (1909-1992). An oil on canvas that measures 77 3/4 by 58 1/8 inches, it was painted in 1979. It has an estimate of $3,000,000 to $4,000,000. It sold for $3,936,000.

"Das Haus" by Kiefer

Lot 46, "Das Haus," by Anselm Kiefer, emulsion, acrylic, shellac, chalk and sunflower seeds on canvas, 109 3/8 by 148 1/2 inches, 1996

Lot 46 is a large an impressive work by Anselm Kiefer (b. 1945). The emulsion, acrylic, shellac, chalk and sunflower seeds work is entitled "Das Haus" and measures 109 3/8 by 148 1/2 inches. Executed in 1996, it has an estimate of $700,000 to $900,000. It sold for $744,000. "The seminal sixteenth and seventeenth century mystical philosopher Robert Fludd...declared that 'every plant, everything on earth, has its equivalent star in heaven,''' the catalogue entry for this lot observed, adding that "In 1996, Anselm Kiefer took Fludd's statement as the root source of a series of Star paintings in which he sought to visually demonstrate this idea as if it were the spectacular and elaborate product of some celestial archiving system. For Kiefer, as it was for his artistic mentor and predecessor Joseph Beuys, art is a mystical practice through which the holoistic nature of the universe reveals itself....Das Haus belongs to a series of figureless paintings that depict modern terrestial landscapes set against the star-filled night sky and overladen with Fludd's cosmic maps of microcosm and the macrocosm. One of the early champions of Rosicrucianism, Fludd was a Renaissance man who attempted to merge gnostic belief, Christianity, the Kabbalah and the discoveries of modern science into a cohesive picture of the universe. His syncretic approach evidentaly appealed to Kiefer whose art is itself often a project of as a similar appoach. In Das Haus Kiefer depicts an ominious and official-looking building with two search lights projecting into the sky. In their light the Kabbalistic diagram of the sephiroth is written and around it Fludd's Philosophia Moysaica is inscribed into the picture surface with Fludd credited to the left."

"The Critic Sees" by Johns

Lot 40, "The Critic Sees," by Jasper Johns, sculptmetal on plaster with glass, 3 1/4 by 6 1/2 by 2 1/4 inches, 1961

Lot 40, "The Critic Sees," is a small sculptmetal on plaster with glass by Jasper Johns (b. 1930) that was once in the collectin of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Scull. It was executed in 1961 and measures 3 1/4 by 6 1/2 by 2 1/4 inches and has an ambitious estimate of $3,500,000 to $5,000,000. It sold for $3,936,000, an auction record for a sculpture by Johns. "In The Critic Sees, Johns presents a soft metallic brick," the catalogue entry noted, "....in which two mouths cast from life seem to speak behind a pair of glasses. The critic's teeth are exposed, one mouth open and the other almost shut, and together they appear like shadowy caverns....The sculpture in a in part a satirical comment on the rhetoric of critics and it was apparently inspired by a three-minute visit from a buffon of a critic to one of Johns' exhibitions. Johns jokes that critics are blind and see with their mouths."

Not all critics, of course, are blind!

"0 Through 9" by Johns

Lot 67, "0 Through 9," by Jasper Johns, cast aluminum, 27 by 20 7/8 inches, 1961, number three of an edition of four

Another Johns is Lot 67, "0 Through 9," a cast aluminum sculpture that measures 27 by 20 7/8 inches. Executed in 1971, it is number three of an edition of 4. It has an estimate of $800,000 to $1,000,000. It sold for $968,000.

"Winter" by Johns

Lot 37, "Winter," by Jasper Johns, charcoal on paper, 42 by 29 7/8 inches, 1986

Lot 37, is a good and large charcoal on paper drawing by Johns that measures 42 by 29 7/8 inches. Executed in 1986, it has an ambitious estimate of $2,000,000 to $3,000,000. It sold for $2,032,000. The catalogue states, unflinchingly and undemonstrably, that "Jasper Johns is our greatest living visual poet," adding that "his mature drawings have the convincing power and the absolute insight of a haiku master."

Lot 7, ""Frank and Jamie," by Maurizio Cattelan, wax and clothes, full size life figures, 2002, one of an edition of three

Maurizio Cattelan (b. 1960) is one of the wittiest artists on the contemporary scene as well as one of the hottest. Lot 7, "Frank and Jamie" are two life-size figures of policemen standing on the heads that was executed in 2002 and is one of an edition of three. It has an estimate of $1,400,000 to $1,800,000. It failed to sell and was passed at $1,300,000.

A far more appearing Cattelan is Lot 64, "Ostrich," in which a full-size taxidermed ostrich has its head stuck in the floor. A unique work executed in 1997, it has an estimate of $1,200,000 to $1,600,000. It failed to sell and was passed at $1,100,000.

Not all of the more contemporary works fared as poorly as the Cattelans.

Lot 71, "No. B., 3," by Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929), a 78-by-70-inch eggcrate and upholstery stuffing work on canvas executed in 1962, had an estimate of $250,000 to $350,000 and sold for $1,050,000. The catalogue provided the following commentary on this lot:

"Donald Judd described Yayoi Kusama as a true original, whose provoctive sexual happenings and mancially obsessive art brought a madcap dimension to the othersiwe austere Miminalist arena of New York in the erly 1960s. Largely overlooked in America following her return to Japan in the mid-1970s, her contribution is only now being reassessed thanks inpart to a major touring retrospective in 1998, with venues at the Los Angeles County Museum of art and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Kusmuma arrived in New York in 1958 and quickly made a name for herself with the polka dot and mesh motifs of her infnity net paintings. She seemed at times desperate for publicity, her sensationalist antics and shock tactics were underscored by deep friendships with serious artists such as Joseph Cornell and Donald Judd. After 1961, she experimented with different mediums in a quqest to express the consuming notion of infinity. Dogged by mental illness, her work appeared to be driven by a neurotically compulsive quality, which formerly married the all-over character of Jackson Pollock with the reductive aesthetic of a burgeoning Minimalist movement. "

Lot 62, "John Lennon," by Elizabeth Peyton (b. 1965), is an oil on masonite that measures 24 1/8 by 19 1/2 inches. Exeucted in 1996, it is a very red painting that is based on a photograph of the famous Beatle taken the year before Peyton was born. The Beatle's face looks more like a women's than a good likance. It has an estimate of $200,000 to $300,000. It sold for $800,000, breaking the artist's previous auction record of $135,899 set at Christie's in London June 27, 2002.

"Briey (Concrete Cabin)" by Doig

Lot 6, "Briey (Concrete Cabin)," by Peter Doig, "oil on canvas, 108 1/4 by 78 1/4 inches, 1994-6

Lot 6 is a strong and large oil on canvas entitled "Briey (Concrete Cabin)," by Peter Doig (b. 1959). It measures 108 1/4 by 78 1/4 inches and was painted 1994-6. It has an ambitious estimate of $600,000 to $800,000. It sold for $632,000, breaking the artist's previous auction record of $479,649 that had been set at Sotheby's in London June 26, 2002.

Lot 5, "Sculpture," is a large oil on canvas by Luc Tuymans (b. 1958) of an African sculpture. It measures 61 bt 25 1/8 in ches and was painted in 2000. It has an estimate of $500,000 to $700,000. It sold for $1,472,000, smashing the artist's previous auction record of $427,500 that had been set November 13, 2003 at Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg.

Auction records were also set for James Rosenquist (b. 1933), Richard Prince (b. 1949), Sigmar Polke (b. 1941), and Thomas Demand (b. 1964). Lot 54, "Be Beautiful," a 54-by-84-inch oil on canvas by Rosenquist that was executed in 1964 sold for $1,248,000 breaking the previous auction record of $512,000 set at Sotheby's New York May 12, 2004. Lot 49, "Calculator,"a 68 7/8-by-172-inch chromogenic color print by Thomas Demand executed in 2001 and one of an edition of six sold for $180,000, breaking his previous auction record of $176,000 set at Sotheby's New York November 9, 2004. Lot 53, "Bavarian," a 62 3/4-by-49-inch oil and dispersion on canvas executed in 1965 by Sigmar Polke said for $1,696,000, just edging past his previous auction record set February 7, 2001 at Sotheby's London. Lot 2, "The Wrong Joke," an acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas that measures 56 by 48 inches and was executed in 1994 by Richard Prince sold for $800,000, breaking the artist's previous auction record for $747,200 set May 13, 2004 at Phillips, de Pury & Company.

Lot 36, "Diana," a 29 7/8-by-22 1/4-inch graphite and touche on paper executed in 1965 by Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) sold for $800,000, breaking the artist's previous auction record of $589,000 for a work on paper set at Christies November 16, 2000.

See The City Review article on the May 10, 2005 Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on the Fall 2004 Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on the Fall 2004 Contemporary Art evening auction at Christie's

See The City Review article on the Spring 2004 Contemporary Art evening auction at Christie's

See The City Review article on the May 12, 2004 morning session Contemporary Art auction at Christie's

See The City Review article on the May 12 Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on the May 13 Contemporary Art morning auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on the Fall 2003 Contemporary Art evening auction at Christie's

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's Fall 2003

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Christie's Spring 2003

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's Spring 2003

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Christie's Fall 2002

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's Fall 2002

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art day auction at Christie's in Spring 2002

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's May 15, 2002

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art day auction at Sotheby's May 16, 2002

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction in the fall of 2001 at Christie's

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's that follows this auction November 14, 2001

See The City Review article on the Post-War Art evening auction at Christie's November 13, 2001

See The City Review article on Contemporary Art evening auction at Phillips de Pury & Luxembourgh November 12, 2001

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction in the Spring of 2001

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's May 15, 2001

See The City Review article on the Christie's Post-War Art evening auction May 16, 2001

See The City Review article on the Post-War art day auction at Christie's May 17, 2001

See The City Review article on Post War Art evening auction at Christie's, Nov. 15, 2000

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's, Nov. 14, 2000

See The City Review article on the Contemporary Art evening auction at Phillips, Nov. 13, 2000

See The City Review article on Contemporary Art Part II auction at Phillips, Nov. 14, 2000

See The City Review Article on the May 18-9 Contemporary Art auctions at Phillips

See The City Review article on the May 16, 2000 evening auction of Contemporary Art at Christie's

See The City Review article on the May 17, 2000 Contemporary Art evening auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on the Fall, 1999 auction of Contemporary Art at Christie's

See The City Review article on the Sotheby's Nov. 17, 1999 auction of Contemporary Art

See The City Review article on the auctions of Contemporary Art from a European Private Collection and Contemporary Art, Part 2, at Sotheby's Nov. 18, 1999

See The City Review article on the May 18, 1999 Contemporary Art Auction at Sotheby's

See The City Review article on Contemporary Art Part 2 auction at Sotheby's May 19, 1999

See The City Review article on the Christie's, May 19, 1999 Contemporary Art auction

See The City Review article on the Christie's, May 20, 1999 Contemporary Art Part 2 auction

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